The Bulletproof Diet

I first heard of The Bulletproof Diet on a podcast. Supposedly, it works with your body’s chemistry to help you think clearer and to jump start your metabolism.  It’s key foundation is to eat more fat. What intrigued me is that it was an actor (of course) who said he followed this diet and it seemed to help him think better and look good without having to spend hours in the gym.  I’ve not heard of a lot of actors talk about how eating fat can help them, and if I can avoid hours at the gym (which I already seem pretty good at avoiding) and still look good, then I’m intrigued.Bulletproof


Sadly, after reading The Bulletproof Diet, I’m not too impressed by Dave Asprey’s outline for a healthy diet. He advocates for more healthy fats, no nuts, limited fruits, certain veggies, lots of proteins, and no carbs. On the whole, I don’t disagree with him. I believe that everything in moderation is good. However, he cuts out a lot of foods making the diet very restrictive.  There’s just no way that I can actually make this a daily habit.  It’s so restrictive that you’d have to scrap all of your recipes and basically buy his cookbook.  I just don’t see how people sustain this type of diet.  Oh wait, I guess if you’re wealthy enough I supposed you could hire someone to cook these restrictive meals for you (I’m looking at you podcast actor).

The other piece that bothered me is that he’s not a big proponent of cooking things,
i.e. raw food. Sure, somethings may be better raw and eating raw from time to time is good, but it’s expensive to buy the organic foods Asprey advocates.  And frankly, an Illinois winter is not a great time to be eating cold soups.  It’s just not going to happen.

All in all, there’s nothing too crazy about what Asprey proposes. There’s several healthy principles he incorporates into his plan, but I just didn’t find it was anything new, revealing, or sustainable.